Question: What Is An Urgent Referral?

How long do urgent referrals take?

WHAT IS AN URGENT REFERRAL.

Your GP has arranged for you to see a hospital doctor (specialist) within two weeks – a process also known as the two-week referral.

This is to investigate your symptoms further..

Are all breast referrals urgent?

Women with a lump or discharge need prompt evaluation. There are between 350,000 and 500,000 referrals to breast clinics a year. Approximately 125,000 GP referrals are marked ‘urgent’.

How long do NHS referrals take?

The maximum waiting time for non-urgent, consultant-led treatments is 18 weeks from the day your appointment is booked through the NHS e-Referral Service, or when the hospital or service receives your referral letter. However, your right to an 18-week waiting time does not apply if: you choose to wait longer.

What is a 2 week wait referral?

A ‘Two Week Wait’ referral is a request from your General Practitioner (GP) to ask the hospital for an urgent appointment for you, because you have symptoms that might indicate that you have cancer.

Do doctors tell you if they suspect cancer?

The doctor may start by asking about your personal and family medical history and do a physical exam. The doctor also may order lab tests, imaging tests (scans), or other tests or procedures. You may also need a biopsy, which is often the only way to tell for sure if you have cancer.

What is the 2 week rule NHS?

An urgent two-week referral means that you will be offered an appointment with a hospital specialist within 2 weeks of your General Practitioner (GP) making the referral. As of April 1st 2010 you have a legal right to be seen by a specialist within this time.

How long does a Gynaecology referral take?

Your GP has referred you to the hospital on an urgent two week wait referral. This means that we will offer you an appointment within two weeks of referral. This is because they have some concerns about some symptoms you have been experiencing, or you had an unusual finding on an ultrasound scan.

Do doctors call right away with bad test results?

Most people assume their doctor will call them if they get a bad test result. But new research shows that doctors frequently fail to inform patients about abnormal test results.

Does an urgent referral mean I have cancer?

An urgent referral is one way that your doctor can refer you to hospital. It means that you have symptoms that could be due to cancer, although they are usually due to other conditions.

What is a red flag referral?

Having a red flag referral does not necessarily mean you have cancer. 94% of people who have a red flag referral don’t have cancer. However, you have been referred because you need to see a specialist or have some investigations quickly to help find out what is wrong with you so it is important you attend.

Do all cancers show up in blood tests?

With the exception of blood cancers, blood tests generally can’t absolutely tell whether you have cancer or some other noncancerous condition, but they can give your doctor clues about what’s going on inside your body.

How would u know if u have cancer?

Cancer diagnosisPhysical exam. Your doctor may feel areas of your body for lumps that may indicate a tumor. … Laboratory tests. Laboratory tests, such as urine and blood tests, may help your doctor identify abnormalities that can be caused by cancer. … Imaging tests. … Biopsy.

What is the 2 week rule?

The 2 week rule (also called 2 week wait) is a referral for patients who have signs and symptoms that can be caused by cancer BUT in my experience, the majority of patients referred on this pathway do not have cancer.

What is classed as an urgent doctors appointment?

An emergency appointment involves seeing a doctor quickly – usually the first appointment with an available doctor. If it’s not with your regular GP and you’d like to see them too, you can ask your surgery about booking a follow-up appointment.

What are the 7 warning signs of cancer?

These are potential cancer symptoms:Change in bowel or bladder habits.A sore that does not heal.Unusual bleeding or discharge.Thickening or lump in the breast or elsewhere.Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing.Obvious change in a wart or mole.Nagging cough or hoarseness.